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6.Change your lightbulbs. Nothing is more frustrating than light bulbs burning out, especially because replacing them is one of those things you put on the to-do list and immediately forget about. Take the time to replace all of those lights for a brighter, happier space. In your bedroom or den, try opting for lower wattage lights (between 20- and 50-watts) to create a cozier and more romantic ambience. Here is a great guide to lighting your home.
Having swing in your own home, yard or garden can be so de-stressing and be relaxing a thing to enjoy, that doesn’t matter you have a big yard or patio, or vacant porch. Kids will surely fall in love with this swing porch and love playing on a breezy day. Even, adults also do relax and enjoy a quite morning coffee, or just being embraced by the sun in the swing.

1. Rearrange your furniture. This may sound simple, but rearranging furniture is a great (and free!) way to completely change the look and feel of your home. If you always find yourself climbing over an ottoman, move your couch back to create a passing lane. Is it too cramped? Try moving your side table to another room that's more spacious. Click here for more tips.


Build your own platform bed frame at your home by following the source linked tutorial given above. The source link also includes more pictures that can help you to build a better bed frame. You can see a step by step set of instructions and guidelines to follow with real life pictures, as well as you can download a PDF file detailing the list of materials and tools you’ll need, know about the length of every board, and most importantly color-coded illustrations of the building process.
Slice, dice and serve in style on this easy, attractive board. We’ll show you a simple way to dry-fit the parts, scribe the arc and then glue the whole thing together. We used a 4-ft. steel ruler to scribe the arcs, but a yardstick or any thin board would also work. Find complete how-to instructions on this woodworking crafts project here. Also, be sure to use water-resistant wood glue and keep your board out of the dishwasher or it might fall apart. And one more thing: Keep the boards as even as possible during glue-up to minimize sanding later. For great tips on gluing wood, check out this collection.

We have an array of home grade tools including a chop saw, contractors table saw, drill press, various sanders, planer, joiner, lathe, band saw, panel saw, scroll saw, and other various hand tools. In addition we also have a metal shop, blacksmith area, an industrial robot, various CNC machines, an indoor ventilation(paint) area, electronics lab, 3d printing area, pottery area, clean craft/sewing area. We are a nonprofit with about 200 members and about 30,000 sq. feet, membership is $40 a month and includes a small storage area along with 24 hour building access. Check out our website www.milwaukeemakerspace.org and come on down to our weekly meeting on Tuesday’s at 7pm, we’re the big red building behind McDonalds in beautiful Bayview. http://wiki.milwaukeemakerspace.org/equipment

Steve Brown CF '90, Instructor in the Cabinet & Furniture Making program, recently published a great how-to article in Fine Woodworking. The classic cabriole leg is a solid design choice for period furniture makers, but even with just that leg style, choosing from a variety of foot styles to go with it can be daunting. Steve helps clarify the process with step-by-step instructions for laying out and carving three common feet for the cabriole leg: the pad, slipper, and trifid foot.


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Making a garden arched footbridge out of some wood boards can be fun, hard working plan and also it’s quite rewarding. We are providing the project tutorial for how to build an arched footbridge without rails or having rails. If you take your hands of work and have some basic woodworking skills you can easily build this type of bridge. While this garden bridge is too small to walk over but it can make a really stunning addition to your lush yard or garden.
All it took for us to elevate a basic knife block ($25.95; cutleryandmore.com)? A pencil and some paint. Begin by spray-painting the block with two coats of Rustoleum's white semigloss ($4.19 for 12 ounces; amazon.com). Allow two hours of drying time between coats; then let them dry overnight. Next, lay the block faceup. Using the knives you plan to keep in the block, lay one utensil atop the block in a spot that reflects the blade's placement when stored; carefully trace the shape with a pencil. Repeat with the other three knives. Fill the inside of each shape with another paint color—we used Benjamin Moore's Clearspring Green ($6.49 for 16 ounces; benjaminmoore.com). Let dry for two hours , add a second coat, then let dry again before inserting the cutlery.
Attending a furniture design school provides a student with an opportunity to discover their craft, learn and develop design methods and techniques, master technical advancements in areas such as sustainability, and ultimately determine the trajectory of their career. Hands on experience is a vital element of the learning process, as is comprehensive knowledge of materials and their properties. The graduate leaves school with a portfolio showcasing their unique talents and abilities.

​Luckily, we have also managed to find a detailed video tutorial of the Barn door project that illustrates the process of building a Barn door of your own. The steps and instructions in the video tutorial are different from the source links listed above. Actually, you can make different types of designs for your Barn door depending on which one you can afford easily and DIY on your own.
We will suggest you select the simple Birdhouse if you are new at woodworking but be sure to select its design with respect to the place where you are going to hang/place it. One of our simple Birdhouse tutorials will help you building one. We have managed to include a source tutorial below that will help you to understand illustrates and the instruction to building a simple Birdhouse.
First, use a drill to make a 1/8-inch-wide hole halfway down into a new cork ($3.99 for 30; winemakingsuperstore.com). Next, twist off the top of a vintage trophy (typically a few bucks each at thrift shops and garage sales). Apply superglue to the underside of the trophy top's base and the screw that extends from it. Insert the screw into the cork and twist the pieces together until flush and a tight bond forms. Allow one hour of drying time before using your prize design.
I know I’ve been a little MIA but we’ve had a big project in the backyard, an overwhelming workload (which we planned on being MUCH less), and then decided to hire out for some help to haul away a huge amount of dirt.  Unfortunately, that ended up with the guy we hired stealing from us…..uggggh.  When will we ever learn to not be so trusting?!  Steve and I both have a problem with that……but when did being “too trusting” become such an extreme character flaw?!!  Sad.  Anyway, the whole situation is under investigation and there are some definite twists to the story that the crime-show-watcher in me would love to share with any other crime-show-watching enthusiasts out there. ;) Hopefully soon.
Work Study:  Students may apply for our Work Study option.   In return for acting as Shop Monitor during open shop periods, MSF will reduce the student’s tuition.  Shop monitors must be present in the shop during assigned hours primarily to enhance safety (assigned hours will not conflict with class hours).  Among other responsibilities, Shop Monitors make sure policies are honored and are responsible for the leaving the shop in good order at the end of their shift.  If space is available, Monitors may use the shop to work on their own projects during their shifts.  Our preference is to award work study positions first to students experiencing financial hardship.  Please notify us if you are interested in work study .  For more information, see our Tuitions & Registration page.
As a custom furniture maker at NBSS, you’ll learn how to use and maintain both hand tools and power equipment. You’ll estimate costs, choose materials, and prepare working drawings for each project. You’ll cut various joints, turn, carve, and bend wood, apply marquetry or veneers. You’ll develop the knowledge, skills, and confidence necessary to create thoughtful furniture pieces to exacting standards.
Most of our products are in stock waiting and ready to ship the day you order them (look for our green IN STOCK icon) – and if you purchase a PRO Membership, you get free standard shipping for an entire year. We guarantee satisfaction on your order and know you will find the best products when you shop with us! We aim to be the first company you call when you need woodworking or building products. Make us your go-to supplier!
Established in 1906, the College for Creative Studies is a small, private, fully-accredited institution of higher learning. Diversity and inclusion characterize the student body: undergraduates hail from 35 states and 24 countries; while the graduate population is comprised of 81% international enrollees from 8 countries. Located in Midtown Detroit, students enjoy the long-established, rich culture of the city. From the Detroit Film Theatre and the Detroit Institute of Arts; to the libraries, galleries and famous restaurants; both college and students can leverage the educational opportunities provided by the urban community.
Finishing:  It’s important to know how to select the right finish for the job and wood.  We train students in surface and material preparation, and in hand applied finishes such as oil, shellac, and varnishes.  Classes include selecting color and applying stains.  Specialty finishes such as French polishing are also covered along with training in how to use tools for finishing work and the proper use of fillers.
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