This class is open to woodworkers who would like to broaden their approach to furniture making. What do we mean by this? We think it means you are a person who has decided to commit to learning furniture making; is yearning to develop a finer sense of design; has already acquired some woodworking skills and has a strong sense of the limitations of your own knowledge and skills.

Carving a Fan for Your Next Piece of Furniture The Carved Fan in Furniture Carvings found on 18th furniture are sometimes an ostentatious display of vines and leaves which cover nearly every exposed surface of the chair or chest to which they’re applied. I’ve always had a greater appreciation for minimal amounts of carving that accentuate a furniture […]
Finishing:  It’s important to know how to select the right finish for the job and wood.  We train students in surface and material preparation, and in hand applied finishes such as oil, shellac, and varnishes.  Classes include selecting color and applying stains.  Specialty finishes such as French polishing are also covered along with training in how to use tools for finishing work and the proper use of fillers.

Training Length & Times:  Each professional training session (Fall, Winter, Spring) is 12 weeks in length and may include students at the Basic, Intermediate, or Master level. Our entire program takes 9 months to complete and so we recommend that students enroll in 3 consecutive sessions in order to complete the full curriculum.  Students attend small-group lectures, receive individualized instruction, and complete specific projects that are designed for their experience level.  Class instruction is available Mondays-Fridays from 9:00am-4:30pm with a 1-hour break for lunch.  The shop remains available for independent student work from 4:30pm to at least 8:00pm on most days.  The school is closed on holidays and there is a break between sessions and over part of the summer.  See our current schedule for specific session dates.
All it took for us to elevate a basic knife block ($25.95; cutleryandmore.com)? A pencil and some paint. Begin by spray-painting the block with two coats of Rustoleum's white semigloss ($4.19 for 12 ounces; amazon.com). Allow two hours of drying time between coats; then let them dry overnight. Next, lay the block faceup. Using the knives you plan to keep in the block, lay one utensil atop the block in a spot that reflects the blade's placement when stored; carefully trace the shape with a pencil. Repeat with the other three knives. Fill the inside of each shape with another paint color—we used Benjamin Moore's Clearspring Green ($6.49 for 16 ounces; benjaminmoore.com). Let dry for two hours , add a second coat, then let dry again before inserting the cutlery.
Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
Tualatin, OR — October 1, 2014 — SawStop, LLC, the world leader in table saw safety, is celebrating 10 years of designing and manufacturing the world’s safest table saws. To commemorate the anniversary, between October 1 and December 31, 2014, in the United States and Canada each customer who purchases a new Industrial Cabinet Saw will receive over $200 in free […]
Copyright 2018 by Cut The Wood. CutTheWood.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. Additionally, CutTheWood.com participates in various other affiliate programs, and we sometimes get a commission through purchases made through our links.
Prerequisites:  Each level (Basic, Intermediate, and Master-Level) is a prerequisite for the next.  However, students entering our Professional Training series can submit to a Skills Assessment by one of MSF’s instructors to determine if they may enter into the program and receive more advanced instruction without first satisfying previous training requirements.
Build your own platform bed frame at your home by following the source linked tutorial given above. The source link also includes more pictures that can help you to build a better bed frame. You can see a step by step set of instructions and guidelines to follow with real life pictures, as well as you can download a PDF file detailing the list of materials and tools you’ll need, know about the length of every board, and most importantly color-coded illustrations of the building process.
Steve Brown CF '90, Instructor in the Cabinet & Furniture Making program, recently published a great how-to article in Fine Woodworking. The classic cabriole leg is a solid design choice for period furniture makers, but even with just that leg style, choosing from a variety of foot styles to go with it can be daunting. Steve helps clarify the process with step-by-step instructions for laying out and carving three common feet for the cabriole leg: the pad, slipper, and trifid foot.
Our offering includes brass plated butt hinges, continuous (�piano�) hinges, precision milled and extruded solid brass hinges for cabinets and furniture, traditional overlay and inset cabinet hinges in a number of finishes, Soss invisible hinges, cylinder hinges, European style cup hinges for face frame and frameless (panel) construction cabinets, and hinges for bi-fold door, angled door, thick door, molded edge door, overhead bin door, flap, tray and tabletop applications.
We will review the history of furniture making in America with a visit to the Decorative Arts Collection at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston and have Cambridge artist/craftsman Mitch Ryerson show us his work and talk about design process. Students will learn traditional woodworking techniques beginning with the use of hand tools, power tools and finally woodworking machines.
Easy woodworking projects are a great way to test your DIY skill level. It's always such an accomplishment when you complete a DIY project you spent time and effort on. DIY woodworking projects can also be intimidating at first especially with all the hand tools you must use. Once you have all you need, however, from tools to a step-by-step guide, you can start making the designs more efficiently. If you're new to woodworking, continue reading below and find easy woodworking projects suited for any beginner.
Work Study:  Students may apply for our Work Study option.   In return for acting as Shop Monitor during open shop periods, MSF will reduce the student’s tuition.  Shop monitors must be present in the shop during assigned hours primarily to enhance safety (assigned hours will not conflict with class hours).  Among other responsibilities, Shop Monitors make sure policies are honored and are responsible for the leaving the shop in good order at the end of their shift.  If space is available, Monitors may use the shop to work on their own projects during their shifts.  Our preference is to award work study positions first to students experiencing financial hardship.  Please notify us if you are interested in work study .  For more information, see our Tuitions & Registration page.

But they had to start somewhere too right. If you’re looking to get into it, here some simple woodworking ideas that can get you started. There are a lot of cool projects about some easy wood ideas from wooden desks, shelves wooden clamps, trays and decorative articles to coffee table plans, rocking chairs wine holders, clocks, fences, wall designs, bird houses, cutlery, coasters and what not, that you can try as beginners and they tell you how to do it step by step.
This course is focused on developing the skills that will allow you to start to find your voice as a furniture designer / maker. Design will be the consistent thread through the numerous projects of this class. We will take a hybrid approach to furniture making by blending traditional hand tool techniques with pragmatic use of woodworking machines. 
×