We will review the history of furniture making in America with a visit to the Decorative Arts Collection at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston and have Cambridge artist/craftsman Mitch Ryerson show us his work and talk about design process. Students will learn traditional woodworking techniques beginning with the use of hand tools, power tools and finally woodworking machines.
Turning:  Turning is an art in and of itself.  In these classes, students are mentored in how to choose and work with the perfect wood to get the perfect turning result.  We teach wet and dry wood work, specialty tool use such as lathes and skew chisels, and how to make custom tools for specific projects.  Techniques for spindle-work, hollow-end grain work, faceplate turning, and milling will be covered. We address special joinery considerations and precision fitting parts.
Just make sure to use non-toxic wood and non-toxic finishes like Raw Linseed Oil or Carnauba Wax so that dangerous chemicals from other woods and finishes doesn’t contaminate the food that goes onto the cutting board. You can also opt to include an indent for the knife, so the chef can put the knife into the cutting board when the knife is not currently in use.
We will suggest you select the simple Birdhouse if you are new at woodworking but be sure to select its design with respect to the place where you are going to hang/place it. One of our simple Birdhouse tutorials will help you building one. We have managed to include a source tutorial below that will help you to understand illustrates and the instruction to building a simple Birdhouse.
Blogger Brittany Moser of darkroomanddearly.com made these Polaroid-inspired drink rests from color photos and square tiles (a steal at 15 cents apiece). First, trim a photo to 3 3/4"W x 3 1/4"H. Using a foam brush, spread Mod Podge on the back of the image; then position it on a tile, leaving a 1/4-inch border at the top and sides, and a 3/4-inch border at the bottom. Let dry for 30 minutes. Spread Mod Podge over the photo and exposed tile borders and let dry for one hour; repeat two to three more times. Spray with clear sealant and let dry for 24 hours. Finally, affix adhesive felt pads to the underside corners of your picture-perfect tiles.
Get a head start on a clutter-free life with these DIY organization ideas! Sometimes, all a person really needs is some inspiration on how to maximize the potential of their home. If you’re like most people and find the costs of remodeling and home improvement totally intimidating, don’t worry. These DIY organizing tips won’t stop you from making the most of your home — even on a budget! Trust me, these tips and tricks will do wonders in your home.

Slice, dice and serve in style on this easy, attractive board. We’ll show you a simple way to dry-fit the parts, scribe the arc and then glue the whole thing together. We used a 4-ft. steel ruler to scribe the arcs, but a yardstick or any thin board would also work. Find complete how-to instructions on this woodworking crafts project here. Also, be sure to use water-resistant wood glue and keep your board out of the dishwasher or it might fall apart. And one more thing: Keep the boards as even as possible during glue-up to minimize sanding later. For great tips on gluing wood, check out this collection.
Finding a toolbox for a mechanic, for his hand tools, is not a big challenge at all - there are dozens of the tool boxes available on the market, from huge roll-around shop cases to small metal boxes. Plumbers, electricians, and farmers are well served, too, with everything from pickup-truck storage to toolboxes and belts. But, if you are a shop-bound woodworker then the case changes. You get to need a tool box that suits the range and variety of hand tools that most woodworkers like to have. For those who deny making do with second best, there's only one solution, you’ve to build a wooden toolbox that should be designed expressly for a woodworking shop.
Because of his years of professional woodworking, his knowledge is broad. As a long-time professional woodworker he has built countless examples of fine dovetailed casework and drawers, carved tables, delicate inlay, sculpted chairs and elegant turned post beds. You’ll benefit from both his vast knowledge of woodworking and his many years of teaching experience. He’s also written six woodworking books as well as numerous articles for Fine Woodworking magazine.
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