Steve Brown CF '90, Instructor in the Cabinet & Furniture Making program, recently published a great how-to article in Fine Woodworking. The classic cabriole leg is a solid design choice for period furniture makers, but even with just that leg style, choosing from a variety of foot styles to go with it can be daunting. Steve helps clarify the process with step-by-step instructions for laying out and carving three common feet for the cabriole leg: the pad, slipper, and trifid foot.
Course Entry Points:  There is great value in moving through our series of courses with a cohesive cohort of peers and our goal is to support this by having published start dates for each session.  However, because the nature of the instruction is so individualized, MSF may make allowances for students who wish to enter mid-session.  For example, If a student wants to enter in week 3 of the 12-week session, we may allow their enrollment contingent on their willingness to work outside of structured class hours and receive individual tutoring.
To start off this list of simple woodworking projects is a DIY sawhorse which will be very helpful to you if you don’t own a ShopBot Buddy. A sawhorse always comes in handy especially if you have more plans of woodworking in the future. Before you get started on this woodworking project, get one of these extension cords with built-in outlets for your power tools to help you out! 

Build this handy stool in one hour and park it in your closet. You can also use it as a step to reach the high shelf. All you need is a 4 x 4-ft. sheet of 3/4-in. plywood, wood glue and a handful of 8d finish nails. Cut the plywood pieces according to the illustration. Spread wood glue on the joints, then nail them together with 8d finish nails. First nail through the sides into the back. Then nail through the top into the sides and back. Finally, mark the location of the two shelves and nail through the sides into the shelves. Don’t have floor space to spare? Build these super simple wall-mounted shoe organizers instead!
Aside from the privacy it offers, a latticework porch trellis is a perfect way to add major curb appeal to your home for $100 or less. The trellis shown here is made of cedar, but any decay-resistant wood like redwood, cypress or treated pine would also be a good option. Constructed with lap joints for a flat surface and an oval cutout for elegance, it’s a far upgrade from traditional premade garden lattice. As long as you have experience working a router, this project’s complexity lies mostly in the time it takes to cut and assemble. Get the instructions complete with detailed illustrations here.
After seeing this list of easy woodworking projects with step-by-step instructions, crafting projects made with wood isn't actually hard to start. If you have some wood, the proper hand tools, and a little know-how, for sure you can build one or twenty-two of these wooden project plans. They are the perfect stylish additions to your home and you will now have a collection which you can be proud of as your very own work. From planters to a picnic table, name it and you can build it!
As Chief Creative Officer and Founding Partner at Brit + Co, Anjelika Temple brings her voracious consumption of all things creative and colorful to DIY projects, geeky gadgetry finds and more. When she's not DIY-ing her heart out, you'll find her throwing dinner parties with friends or adventuring with her husband David, their daughter Anokhi, and their silly dog Turkey.
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There are a few common types of degrees that most furniture design schools offer. Associate and bachelor’s degrees typically enable students to learn the fundamentals of furniture design, as well as advanced techniques. These types of degrees usually take students two or four years to complete. Students who are looking for a more in depth education or those who would like to focus on a specific aspect of furniture design may want to consider earning a Master’s degree in furniture design.

8.Transform A Coffee Table. If you have a glass-topped coffee table, try sticking photographs underneath the glass for a new look. It'll bring a personal touch to the space, reduce the need for frames and changing the photos is easy. If you don't have a glass-topped coffee table, but like the idea, you can easily buy custom-cut glass from the hardware store.

Cut the 6-1/2-in. x 3-in. lid from the leftover board, and slice the remaining piece into 1/4-in.-thick pieces for the sides and end of the box. Glue them around the plywood floor. Cut a rabbet on three sides of the lid so it fits snugly on the box and drill a 5/8-in. hole for a finger pull. Then just add a finish and you’ve got a beautiful, useful gift. If you don’t have time to make a gift this year, consider offering to do something for the person. You could offer to sharpen their knives! Here’s how.

Relax and enjoy your outdoor space with this smart patio combo consisting of a sofa and chair. You can adjust the size completely to make it fit perfectly onto your patio or deck, and both the sofa and chair have arms that double as trays for al fresco dining. And you can make your own cushions to fit, or use shop-bought ones and add your own ties, if necessary.


Finding a toolbox for a mechanic, for his hand tools, is not a big challenge at all - there are dozens of the tool boxes available on the market, from huge roll-around shop cases to small metal boxes. Plumbers, electricians, and farmers are well served, too, with everything from pickup-truck storage to toolboxes and belts. But, if you are a shop-bound woodworker then the case changes. You get to need a tool box that suits the range and variety of hand tools that most woodworkers like to have. For those who deny making do with second best, there's only one solution, you’ve to build a wooden toolbox that should be designed expressly for a woodworking shop.
1. Rearrange your furniture. This may sound simple, but rearranging furniture is a great (and free!) way to completely change the look and feel of your home. If you always find yourself climbing over an ottoman, move your couch back to create a passing lane. Is it too cramped? Try moving your side table to another room that's more spacious. Click here for more tips.
Although refrigerators long ago rendered them obsolete, antique oak ice boxes remain popular with collectors, even though they’re expensive and hard to find. This do-it-yourself version is neither: it’s both inexpensive and easy to build. An authentic reproduction of an original, the project is especially popular when used as a bar, but it has many

The Austin School of Furniture & Design is located at 3508 E. Cesar Chavez St. and shares space with the Splinter Group. Although the school has its own dedicated space, we are also a part of a larger shared warehouse full of makers and artists. ASFD and Splinter Group strongly believe in supporting the woodworking community, furthering the craft and making shop space and education more readily available and affordable for everyone.


1. Rearrange your furniture. This may sound simple, but rearranging furniture is a great (and free!) way to completely change the look and feel of your home. If you always find yourself climbing over an ottoman, move your couch back to create a passing lane. Is it too cramped? Try moving your side table to another room that's more spacious. Click here for more tips.
There’s a lot of space above the shelf in most closets. Even though it’s a little hard to reach, it’s a great place to store seldom-used items. Make use of this wasted space by adding a second shelf above the existing one. Buy enough closet shelving material to match the length of the existing shelf plus enough for two end supports and middle supports over each bracket. Twelve-inch-wide shelving is available in various lengths and finishes at home centers and lumberyards.
Wortheffort is a dedicated woodworking school . A place to inspire, educate and motivate new artisans in this craft. We have afterschool programs, evening classes and long weekend classes targeting all skill ranges. Starting out we’ll specialize in hand tool and basic machinery education but hope to quickly expand into carving, turning, scrolling and sculpting. We also have a YouTube Channel and Facebook page.
All About Wood:  What are the different characteristics of wood – how does each move, shrink, expand, respond – and how does one allow for all of this in design and building?  How do different woods respond to tooling and machinery?  What are practical considerations in selecting woods for different types of furniture – along with aesthetic considerations, finishing characteristics, issues with availability, cost, purchase sources, and environmental considerations?
1. Rearrange your furniture. This may sound simple, but rearranging furniture is a great (and free!) way to completely change the look and feel of your home. If you always find yourself climbing over an ottoman, move your couch back to create a passing lane. Is it too cramped? Try moving your side table to another room that's more spacious. Click here for more tips.
Uses Sisters High School shop (2000+ SqFt). SHS shop has seven workbenches with quick release vises and additional work/assembly tables. Stationary tools include a SawStop tablesaw, two bandsaws, jointer, planer, 2 drill press’s, a wide belt sander, belt and disk sanders and a grinder. Portable powertools include circular and jig saws, drills, plate joiner, routers, ro sanders. Handtools (provided by the instructor) include measuring and marking tools a variety of handsaws, bench, block, scraping and joinery planes, rasps & files, chisels, gouges and sharpening equipment. Topics include SAFETY, wood selection, tool buying and maintenance, sharpening, joinery and finishing. One instructor. Class size is limited to fourteen students.
We cut the supports 16 in. long, but you can place the second shelf at whatever height you like. Screw the end supports to the walls at each end. Use drywall anchors if you can’t hit a stud. Then mark the position of the middle supports onto the top and bottom shelves with a square and drill 5/32-in. clearance holes through the shelves. Drive 1-5/8-in. screws through the shelf into the supports. You can apply this same concept to garage storage. See how to build double-decker garage storage shelves here.
The beauty of this project lies in the simplicity. All you need are 3 pieces of wood of your choice (though we must admit natural hardwoods will look incredible), sanding block, clamps, wood glue and finishing product. The hardest step of the whole tutorial is measuring – as always, measure 9 times, cut once! You wouldn’t want to finish your project and then realize it doesn’t have enough space to fit your DVD player, would you?
Making a garden arched footbridge out of some wood boards can be fun, hard working plan and also it’s quite rewarding. We are providing the project tutorial for how to build an arched footbridge without rails or having rails. If you take your hands of work and have some basic woodworking skills you can easily build this type of bridge. While this garden bridge is too small to walk over but it can make a really stunning addition to your lush yard or garden.
Relax and enjoy your outdoor space with this smart patio combo consisting of a sofa and chair. You can adjust the size completely to make it fit perfectly onto your patio or deck, and both the sofa and chair have arms that double as trays for al fresco dining. And you can make your own cushions to fit, or use shop-bought ones and add your own ties, if necessary.
Step 3: Place your lampshade upside down on a flat surface. Apply a line of hot glue along the length of one stick's back side, and adhere it to the lampshade, placing the notched handle end flush against the top edge (the ends of the sticks may extend past your shade's bottom edge). Repeat with remaining sticks, placing them side by side until the lampshade is covered. Finally, flip it over and position your shade on a pendant- or table-lamp base to really brighten a room.
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