Blogger Brittany Moser of darkroomanddearly.com made these Polaroid-inspired drink rests from color photos and square tiles (a steal at 15 cents apiece). First, trim a photo to 3 3/4"W x 3 1/4"H. Using a foam brush, spread Mod Podge on the back of the image; then position it on a tile, leaving a 1/4-inch border at the top and sides, and a 3/4-inch border at the bottom. Let dry for 30 minutes. Spread Mod Podge over the photo and exposed tile borders and let dry for one hour; repeat two to three more times. Spray with clear sealant and let dry for 24 hours. Finally, affix adhesive felt pads to the underside corners of your picture-perfect tiles.

The engineering involved in building this garden bench is pretty simple, and we have provided some links to get a full cut list and plans with photos to help you along the way. Additionally, to the stock lumber, you will need wood screws, barrel locks, and hinges to complete the table. A miter saw or hand saw is also extremely helpful for cutting down your stock to the correct angle and length.
We offer great projects — Our projects are beautifully-proportioned, attractive designs that you’re sure to be proud of as you create heirloom furniture. In fact, many people say that we offer some of the best woodworking projects in the USA! Lonnie personally custom-designs each furniture project to combine classic good looks with time-tested mortise-and-tenon and dovetail joints. These joints are considered the hallmark of fine craftsmanship. Lonnie also designs each woodworking project to maximize your learning experience so that you take new home techniques and skills.
We cut the supports 16 in. long, but you can place the second shelf at whatever height you like. Screw the end supports to the walls at each end. Use drywall anchors if you can’t hit a stud. Then mark the position of the middle supports onto the top and bottom shelves with a square and drill 5/32-in. clearance holes through the shelves. Drive 1-5/8-in. screws through the shelf into the supports. You can apply this same concept to garage storage. See how to build double-decker garage storage shelves here.

We’ve already done rope, and now we’re on to another rustic material we love: wood! It’s as basic of a material as clay and is constantly reinvented by DIYers, crafters, artists, hackers, and carpenters. To get inspired to create our own batch of cool wooden objects, we turned to our favorite fellow makers to see what projects they’ve come up with. Scroll down for our top DIY wood project picks.
These charming accessories don't require any special tools to create. We simply gathered up four key rings and strung on: a brass cow tag, a plastic toy calf, a two-inch wooden printing block, and a couple vintage skeleton keys. A key ring can loop directly through the holes of the cow tag and skeleton keys; for the calf and printing block, just center and screw in a metal eye hook with your hands, then link the key ring through (key rings, $2.17 for 25; 1" diam.; eye hooks, 59 cents for 20; ⅝"; zorotools.com). For similar fobs, head to Michaels for the calf figurine ($2.99; michaels.com for stores), and search Etsy or eBay for tags, blocks, and keys (from $3 each).
All images and tutorials on this blog are copyrighted material.Please contact me if you would like to borrow any media (photos, video or audio files), tutorials, or ideas from this blog. 99% of the time I would be happy to allow you to use one photo with appropriate credit and link back to PrettyHandyGirl.com (preferably to the same post it was borrowed from.) I can be contacted via email: PrettyHandyGirl (at) gmail.com.
When you take a class with Lonnie you’ll receive lots of personal attention and instruction. You won’t get lost in a large crowd and you won’t have to “take a number” to get the help that you need (and let’s face it, isn’t that why you’re taking a woodworking class—to receive instruction?). Whether it’s carving a claw-and-ball foot, sawing a dovetail, creating decorative inlay, or sharpening a plane, Lonnie will demonstrate it personally to you at your bench. As a result of our small furniture making classes, you’ll learn more skills and have a more enjoyable experience.
We are a woodworking school centered on traditional hand tool use. Our instructors are passionate about woodworking and about the preservation of the traditions of working wood by hand. Classes are small and each student is provided their own bench and set of tools. During classes students are given the opportunity to try many different tools from many different manufactures to help them make informed decisions on their future tool purchases.
Training Length & Times:  Each professional training session (Fall, Winter, Spring) is 12 weeks in length and may include students at the Basic, Intermediate, or Master level. Our entire program takes 9 months to complete and so we recommend that students enroll in 3 consecutive sessions in order to complete the full curriculum.  Students attend small-group lectures, receive individualized instruction, and complete specific projects that are designed for their experience level.  Class instruction is available Mondays-Fridays from 9:00am-4:30pm with a 1-hour break for lunch.  The shop remains available for independent student work from 4:30pm to at least 8:00pm on most days.  The school is closed on holidays and there is a break between sessions and over part of the summer.  See our current schedule for specific session dates.

Most of our products are in stock waiting and ready to ship the day you order them (look for our green IN STOCK icon) – and if you purchase a PRO Membership, you get free standard shipping for an entire year. We guarantee satisfaction on your order and know you will find the best products when you shop with us! We aim to be the first company you call when you need woodworking or building products. Make us your go-to supplier!


Cut off a 21-in.-long board for the shelves, rip it in the middle to make two shelves, and cut 45-degree bevels on the two long front edges with a router or table saw. Bevel the ends of the other board, cut dadoes, which are grooves cut into the wood with a router or a table saw with a dado blade, cross- wise (cut a dado on scrap and test-fit the shelves first!) and cut it into four narrower boards, two at 1-3/8 in. wide and two at 4 in.
Craft projects that don’t require you to go out to the craft store and purchase a lot of supplies can be difficult to find, which puts a crimp in crafting plans when you don’t have a lot of money to spend. Although most of these projects do require you have materials on hand, most are things the average person has around the house (scraps from previous projects, old clothing, salt, soda bottles) or are things you can easily obtain for free (leaves, rocks, twigs, shells).
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Hi there, I'm glad that you are here. Firstly, let me introduce you that my name is Kevin Smith and I'm a coffee addicted guy, a blogger. Secondly, the reason why I create this website is to analyze what's the best products on the market with high quality and affordable price so that I make a decision to buy the right products for my family, friends and me. Thirdly, I just want to learn more about Home & Improvement Tools and Appliances so that I could improve my sweet little home.
This time I surprised one of my favorite dice games and took it outside. I made a set of wooden dice in just a few hours, and instead of sitting in the room and doing nothing, we are taking our dice game out into the yard. With this set of wooden dice, dice games are becoming our favorite backyard game. Check out the step by step tutorial below so you can make your own.
Ben Hobbs has been building period reproduction furniture for nearly 30 years. After teaching high school math for 10 years, Ben's passion for early American furniture and architecture drew him into the shop in 1982. Since then, Ben has operated as a bespoke custom furniture maker reproducing fine early American pieces, focusing on Southern and local NC examples. After training all three of his sons to be accomplished furniture makers, Ben opened his shop doors in 1996 to train students in his woodworking school.

We have an array of home grade tools including a chop saw, contractors table saw, drill press, various sanders, planer, joiner, lathe, band saw, panel saw, scroll saw, and other various hand tools. In addition we also have a metal shop, blacksmith area, an industrial robot, various CNC machines, an indoor ventilation(paint) area, electronics lab, 3d printing area, pottery area, clean craft/sewing area. We are a nonprofit with about 200 members and about 30,000 sq. feet, membership is $40 a month and includes a small storage area along with 24 hour building access. Check out our website www.milwaukeemakerspace.org and come on down to our weekly meeting on Tuesday’s at 7pm, we’re the big red building behind McDonalds in beautiful Bayview. http://wiki.milwaukeemakerspace.org/equipment
Build this handy stool in one hour and park it in your closet. You can also use it as a step to reach the high shelf. All you need is a 4 x 4-ft. sheet of 3/4-in. plywood, wood glue and a handful of 8d finish nails. Cut the plywood pieces according to the illustration. Spread wood glue on the joints, then nail them together with 8d finish nails. First nail through the sides into the back. Then nail through the top into the sides and back. Finally, mark the location of the two shelves and nail through the sides into the shelves. Don’t have floor space to spare? Build these super simple wall-mounted shoe organizers instead!
Working on one side at a time, glue and nail the side to the back. Apply glue and drive three 1-5/8-in. nails into each shelf, attach the other side and nail those shelves into place to secure them. Clamps are helpful to hold the unit together while you’re driving nails. Center the top piece, leaving a 2-in. overhang on both sides, and glue and nail it into place. Paint or stain the unit and then drill pilot holes into the top face of each side of the unit and screw in the hooks to hold your ironing board. Mount the shelf on drywall using screw-in wall anchors.
Industrial design degrees are similar to furniture design degrees. However, students working toward earning industrial design degrees don’t usually focus just on furniture. Instead, they focus on designing and building a number of different consumer products. Some of the areas that industrial design instructors might touch on may include toy design, automobile design, and product design.
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