Aside from the privacy it offers, a latticework porch trellis is a perfect way to add major curb appeal to your home for $100 or less. The trellis shown here is made of cedar, but any decay-resistant wood like redwood, cypress or treated pine would also be a good option. Constructed with lap joints for a flat surface and an oval cutout for elegance, it’s a far upgrade from traditional premade garden lattice. As long as you have experience working a router, this project’s complexity lies mostly in the time it takes to cut and assemble. Get the instructions complete with detailed illustrations here.
Carving a Fan for Your Next Piece of Furniture The Carved Fan in Furniture Carvings found on 18th furniture are sometimes an ostentatious display of vines and leaves which cover nearly every exposed surface of the chair or chest to which they’re applied. I’ve always had a greater appreciation for minimal amounts of carving that accentuate a furniture […]
We have a small dining room area in our farmhouse that is separate from the living room and kitchen. The area is much smaller in space than our last house. I was little confused that our typical rectangular farmhouse table was not going to cut it. So, I walked in I came to know that we needed to build a round dining table. So, I searched for a plan design idea and build a very own round farmhouse dining table. I was an amazing DIY plan, I just love it!
We do the busy work — Instead of standing in line to use one of our planers, Lonnie and his assistant plane the lumber for the Woodworking Essentials project before your class begins. This is an important difference between our school and the others: because we plane the boards you’ll spend more of your valuable time learning the enjoyable and important stuff—such as cutting dovetails, learning to sharpen and use hand tools effectively, bandsawing and carving a leg or precisely fitting a drawer.
Blogger Brittany Moser of darkroomanddearly.com made these Polaroid-inspired drink rests from color photos and square tiles (a steal at 15 cents apiece). First, trim a photo to 3 3/4"W x 3 1/4"H. Using a foam brush, spread Mod Podge on the back of the image; then position it on a tile, leaving a 1/4-inch border at the top and sides, and a 3/4-inch border at the bottom. Let dry for 30 minutes. Spread Mod Podge over the photo and exposed tile borders and let dry for one hour; repeat two to three more times. Spray with clear sealant and let dry for 24 hours. Finally, affix adhesive felt pads to the underside corners of your picture-perfect tiles.
To assemble your own, cut velvet ribbon ($1.59 per yard; mjtrim.com) into nine-inch lengths. Purchase ribbon clamps the same width as your ribbon (from $1.50 per 10 pack; artfire.com), then use flat-nose jewelry pliers to affix clamps to both ends of each ribbon. Finish by attaching charms, trinkets, or vintage earrings (from 25 cents each; eebeads.com) to the clamps with jump rings ($5.55 per 100 pack; amazon.com).
As the oldest arts educational institution in the state, Maine College of Art has been helping students succeed since 1882. Located in the picturesque Arts District of Portland, Maine; the college-town enjoys a distinguished reputation for its beauty and artistic culture. Among its numerous awards, the location was named #1 Most Liveable City by Forbes Magazine. The intimacy of a mentorship-based education is ensured with the College’s student to teacher ratio of 10:1 (one of the best in the nation).
We mentor each student to develop the advanced skills needed to express their own inspired, distinctive style.  For example, we may explore the design nuances and practical considerations of working with specialized, exotic woods and surface textures, along with associated unique finishing techniques. We constantly seek those sweet, memorable moments when both instructor and student recognize the student’s shift into their next level of mastery.
Professional Series Completion:  To fully complete MSF’s 9-month Professional Training program, students will need to attend all three levels of training: Basic, Intermediate, and Master-Level which collectively equal 36 weeks / 9 months of classes, and satisfy all class requirements for each level.  Students may enroll in 3 consecutive sessions (Fall, Winter, and Spring – in any order), and complete the entire professional training within 9 months – 1 calendar year.  Alternatively, students may space their training sessions out over a longer period.  For example, they may attend 1 session per year (Fall, Winter, or Spring – in any order), in which case completion of all training levels may take 3 years.  Students enroll in each level/session independently of all others and are not required to commit to / take all three levels of training, though completion of the entire series is highly recommended.  There are significant tuition discounts for students who, at the start of their training, enroll in multiple, consecutive 12-week sessions.
If you bought this superb polished table in a store, it would cost you a fortune, but our detailed instructions will help you make one for less than $100. And it looks like highly polished stone, but no-one would know it’s actually made from concrete with a wooden base. Also, you can embellish the top with leaf prints, like the table shown here, or personalize it with glass or mosaic tiles or imprints of seashells.
Licensing and/or certification requirements for jobs in this field are not the same in every state and may include educational, testing, and/or experiential requirements beyond those offered by your Penn Foster Program. You should contact the state professional licensing board or similar regulatory body in the state(s) where you plan to work to determine their requirements before enrolling in your Program. Please click here for contact information for state licensing/regulatory boards and certain industry licensing information.
But until then, I’ve been thinking of other ways to use my hands and create things.  (Even though many of our saws and tools have been stolen.) But I’m feeling a little antsy to make some quick projects, because creating makes me extremely happy…..so we’re calling this surge in me to create something simple, THERAPY.  In fact, I need to call up a few friends and have them make some with me because friends and creating is a favorite combo of mine!  (Any out of town-ers want to fly in?! ;) )

Woodworker’s Hardware is your one-stop online woodworker’s store for all of your woodworker's supplies.  Shop for everything you need to start and finish your woodworking projects.  Find a huge selection of hardware products including drawer slides, barn door hardware, lazy susans, kitchen cabinet hardware & accessories, and furniture hardware.  We stock thousands of door and cabinet hardware and accessories like knobs, pulls, and hooks for kitchens, bathrooms, and closets. As one of the leading online kitchen cabinet hardware suppliers, shop for soft-close ball bearing drawer slides from top-rated brands like KV and Blum. Check out our sales page for our best offers! Our fully stocked warehouse full of woodworker’s supplies ensures shipping in 24 business hours.
Build this handy stool in one hour and park it in your closet. You can also use it as a step to reach the high shelf. All you need is a 4 x 4-ft. sheet of 3/4-in. plywood, wood glue and a handful of 8d finish nails. Cut the plywood pieces according to the illustration. Spread wood glue on the joints, then nail them together with 8d finish nails. First nail through the sides into the back. Then nail through the top into the sides and back. Finally, mark the location of the two shelves and nail through the sides into the shelves. Don’t have floor space to spare? Build these super simple wall-mounted shoe organizers instead!

Finishing:  It’s important to know how to select the right finish for the job and wood.  We train students in surface and material preparation, and in hand applied finishes such as oil, shellac, and varnishes.  Classes include selecting color and applying stains.  Specialty finishes such as French polishing are also covered along with training in how to use tools for finishing work and the proper use of fillers.
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Building a wine rack is usually a very common beginner's woodworking plan. Creating a wine rack is an easy plan that can most of the time be completed in a day or half, depending on how large and detailed you would like it to be. And the better news is that this free wine rack plan will let you build you a great looking wine rack for much less than it would cost.
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The beauty of this project lies in the simplicity. All you need are 3 pieces of wood of your choice (though we must admit natural hardwoods will look incredible), sanding block, clamps, wood glue and finishing product. The hardest step of the whole tutorial is measuring – as always, measure 9 times, cut once! You wouldn’t want to finish your project and then realize it doesn’t have enough space to fit your DVD player, would you?
It might not be the easiest project in this list, but if you already have some experience with wood cutting and joinery, it won’t be any hassle at all. Thanks to the extremely detailed instructions it shouldn’t really be a problem even if you’re not very familiar with woodworking. This could actually be a great project for refining your woodworking skills as a beginner!
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I just don't get it, guys. Aren't you a large company that ships tons of stuff? How can you mess so much stuff up? Basic process control - you ship lots of Blum slides, right? Haven't you figured out how to package them? And why don't you check the email address you post on the website? When someone leaves the company, why don't you set up an auto-reply so that people emailing her know they won't be getting an answer? And when a customer is angry because you've shorted an order, why don't you FedEx overnight a replacement RIGHT AWAY, rather than use some cut-rate discount shipper?
Need a place to store those beautiful flowers from a loved one or personal garden, but not a big fan of the giant, antique vase? I strongly recommend making a bottle vase holder! These easy to design, easy to make bottle vase holders are the perfect starter project for anyone new to the world of woodworking and looking for a project to help get them off the ground.
Steve Brown CF '90, Instructor in the Cabinet & Furniture Making program, recently published a great how-to article in Fine Woodworking. The classic cabriole leg is a solid design choice for period furniture makers, but even with just that leg style, choosing from a variety of foot styles to go with it can be daunting. Steve helps clarify the process with step-by-step instructions for laying out and carving three common feet for the cabriole leg: the pad, slipper, and trifid foot.
Each of our facilities includes laser cutters, plastics and electronics labs, a machine shop, a wood shop, a metal working shop, a textiles department, welding stations and a waterjet cutter. Members have open access to design software, featuring the entire Autodesk Design Suite. Huge project areas with large work tables are available for completing projects and collaborating with others. Free coffee and fresh popcorn are always available for your enjoyment. We also offer a number of experience-driven corporate events developed specifically to bring teams together and engage them in the act of making.
Put your dusty encyclopedias to good use with this side table. To assemble, cut trim to form a box frame that fits snugly around one book, nail frame to the tabletop’s underside, and paint the top. Drill a hole the size of dowel through each book’s center add glue dowel to the center of the table's underside. Stack encyclopedias, lining up holes, and twisting (as shown). Skewer the dowel through the holes to attach the tabletop
We have a small dining room area in our farmhouse that is separate from the living room and kitchen. The area is much smaller in space than our last house. I was little confused that our typical rectangular farmhouse table was not going to cut it. So, I walked in I came to know that we needed to build a round dining table. So, I searched for a plan design idea and build a very own round farmhouse dining table. I was an amazing DIY plan, I just love it!
Making a garden arched footbridge out of some wood boards can be fun, hard working plan and also it’s quite rewarding. We are providing the project tutorial for how to build an arched footbridge without rails or having rails. If you take your hands of work and have some basic woodworking skills you can easily build this type of bridge. While this garden bridge is too small to walk over but it can make a really stunning addition to your lush yard or garden.
We have an array of home grade tools including a chop saw, contractors table saw, drill press, various sanders, planer, joiner, lathe, band saw, panel saw, scroll saw, and other various hand tools. In addition we also have a metal shop, blacksmith area, an industrial robot, various CNC machines, an indoor ventilation(paint) area, electronics lab, 3d printing area, pottery area, clean craft/sewing area. We are a nonprofit with about 200 members and about 30,000 sq. feet, membership is $40 a month and includes a small storage area along with 24 hour building access. Check out our website www.milwaukeemakerspace.org and come on down to our weekly meeting on Tuesday’s at 7pm, we’re the big red building behind McDonalds in beautiful Bayview. http://wiki.milwaukeemakerspace.org/equipment
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