Build this handy stool in one hour and park it in your closet. You can also use it as a step to reach the high shelf. All you need is a 4 x 4-ft. sheet of 3/4-in. plywood, wood glue and a handful of 8d finish nails. Cut the plywood pieces according to the illustration. Spread wood glue on the joints, then nail them together with 8d finish nails. First nail through the sides into the back. Then nail through the top into the sides and back. Finally, mark the location of the two shelves and nail through the sides into the shelves. Don’t have floor space to spare? Build these super simple wall-mounted shoe organizers instead! 

We have a great location — Our woodworking school is located near Knoxville, Tennessee. We are very accessible (within a day’s drive of 70% of the population in the USA!) for USA woodworkers. While many of our woodworkers come from Southeastern USA locations such as Atlanta, we also have woodworkers who come from further-away places such as Texas, California, Oregon, Washington, Montana, Wyoming, Minnesota, Maine — 43 states so far and counting!  We’ve even had woodworkers come from other countries  — as far away as Australia! Additionally, our location near the Great Smoky Mountains and Gatlingburg ensures that there is an abundance of fantastic activities for you or your family to experience as well.
Some tools required to build a picture frame are a table saw, miter saw, measuring tape, wood glue etc. A table saw with a backing board and miter gauge can be used to get the right angle and lengths of picture frame every time. You can use builders square to arrange the final cut pieces before nailing, screwing or gluing. Check out the video tutorial below for more details.
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TechShop is a playground for creativity. Part fabrication and prototyping studio, part hacker-space and part learning center, TechShop provides access to over $1 million worth of professional equipment and software. We offer comprehensive instruction and expert staff to ensure you have a safe, meaningful and rewarding experience. Most importantly, at TechShop you can explore the world of making in a collaborative and creative environment.
Prerequisites:  Each level (Basic, Intermediate, and Master-Level) is a prerequisite for the next.  However, students entering our Professional Training series can submit to a Skills Assessment by one of MSF’s instructors to determine if they may enter into the program and receive more advanced instruction without first satisfying previous training requirements.
If you're looking for high quality cabinet furniture knobs and pulls at the lowest possible prices, then look no further than Woodworker’s Hardware. We stock an expansive selection of cabinet and bathroom hardware in various styles, sizes and finishes that are guaranteed to help you achieve the look you’re going for. Whether you’re searching for decorative knobs and pulls or a simple style to coordinate with the rest of your home, we’ve got you covered. Additionally, Woodworker's Hardware stocks only cabinet furniture knobs and pulls and other products from top-tier manufacturers like Amerock, KV and more.
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Finding a toolbox for a mechanic, for his hand tools, is not a big challenge at all - there are dozens of the tool boxes available on the market, from huge roll-around shop cases to small metal boxes. Plumbers, electricians, and farmers are well served, too, with everything from pickup-truck storage to toolboxes and belts. But, if you are a shop-bound woodworker then the case changes. You get to need a tool box that suits the range and variety of hand tools that most woodworkers like to have. For those who deny making do with second best, there's only one solution, you’ve to build a wooden toolbox that should be designed expressly for a woodworking shop.
This class is open to woodworkers who would like to broaden their approach to furniture making. What do we mean by this? We think it means you are a person who has decided to commit to learning furniture making; is yearning to develop a finer sense of design; has already acquired some woodworking skills and has a strong sense of the limitations of your own knowledge and skills.
This plan is probably the easiest plan ever added in the list. The one who is working on this project, don’t need any professional skills but just knowing some basics of woodworking will be enough for this DIY. You will get step by step detailed process of this tutorial in the source linked tutorial. This tutorial will surely help you to build this plan quickly.
Cross-stitch makes the leap from fabric to glassware with help from a free font and transparent sticker sheets ($13.99 for ten 8 1/2"W x 11"L sheets; amazon.com). Go to myfonts.com and download the Home Sweet Home font. Use it to type out the names of pantry staples, adding a decorative flourish if you like, in a Microsoft Word document, then adjust the type size and alignment to fit your canisters (from $3.99 for one quart; containerstore.com). Following package instructions for the decal sheets, print your document(s). Once the ink has dried, lightly coat each sheet with a thin layer of hair spray, to prevent smearing; let dry. Cut out and trim each label, then affix to the canisters. Note: The labels won’t be entirely waterproof, so when necessary, carefully wash your canisters by hand.
Blogger Brittany Moser of darkroomanddearly.com made these Polaroid-inspired drink rests from color photos and square tiles (a steal at 15 cents apiece). First, trim a photo to 3 3/4"W x 3 1/4"H. Using a foam brush, spread Mod Podge on the back of the image; then position it on a tile, leaving a 1/4-inch border at the top and sides, and a 3/4-inch border at the bottom. Let dry for 30 minutes. Spread Mod Podge over the photo and exposed tile borders and let dry for one hour; repeat two to three more times. Spray with clear sealant and let dry for 24 hours. Finally, affix adhesive felt pads to the underside corners of your picture-perfect tiles.
Steve Brown CF '90, Instructor in the Cabinet & Furniture Making program, recently published a great how-to article in Fine Woodworking. The classic cabriole leg is a solid design choice for period furniture makers, but even with just that leg style, choosing from a variety of foot styles to go with it can be daunting. Steve helps clarify the process with step-by-step instructions for laying out and carving three common feet for the cabriole leg: the pad, slipper, and trifid foot.
From making your own picture frames to constructing your own furniture, woodwork is one area where many DIY’ers cut their teeth and where many skilled professionals make an honest living. Whether you’re wet behind the ears or a seasoned expert at the craft, here’s a roundup of handy new woodworking tools to consider for your next equipment purchase. PocketJig200 The […]
But they had to start somewhere too right. If you’re looking to get into it, here some simple woodworking ideas that can get you started. There are a lot of cool projects about some easy wood ideas from wooden desks, shelves wooden clamps, trays and decorative articles to coffee table plans, rocking chairs wine holders, clocks, fences, wall designs, bird houses, cutlery, coasters and what not, that you can try as beginners and they tell you how to do it step by step.
To corral shelf-dwelling books or DVDs that like to wander, cut 3/4-in.-thick hardwood pieces into 6-in. x 6-in. squares. Use a band saw or jigsaw to cut a slot along one edge (with the grain) that’s a smidgen wider than the shelf thickness. Stop the notch 3/4 in. from the other edge. Finish the bookend and slide it on the shelf. Want to build the shelves, too? We’ve got complete plans for great-looking shelves here.

Slice, dice and serve in style on this easy, attractive board. We’ll show you a simple way to dry-fit the parts, scribe the arc and then glue the whole thing together. We used a 4-ft. steel ruler to scribe the arcs, but a yardstick or any thin board would also work. Find complete how-to instructions on this woodworking crafts project here. Also, be sure to use water-resistant wood glue and keep your board out of the dishwasher or it might fall apart. And one more thing: Keep the boards as even as possible during glue-up to minimize sanding later. For great tips on gluing wood, check out this collection.
The beauty of this project lies in the simplicity. All you need are 3 pieces of wood of your choice (though we must admit natural hardwoods will look incredible), sanding block, clamps, wood glue and finishing product. The hardest step of the whole tutorial is measuring – as always, measure 9 times, cut once! You wouldn’t want to finish your project and then realize it doesn’t have enough space to fit your DVD player, would you?
Flip the towel right side down. To determine where to place the tabs, center a spatula atop one of the towel’s shorter ends, and use straight pins to mark the spatula’s width. Place a tab at each pinned point, slightly over- lapping the tabs with the top of the towel. Make sure that each tab’s closed side lines up with the pins and that the open sides face each other. Remove the pins, then topstitch both tabs in place. Repeat on the towel’s other short end.

Wall-mounted or placed on a table or countertop, this handsome display cabinet is the perfect way to share any collection while keeping it clean and protected at the same time. Featuring tempered glass doors and three shelves, the cabinet’s design calls for all straight cuts and straightforward construction techniques (simple cut-outs give the effect of
3.Rearrange the bookshelf. Reorganizing the bookshelf will easily make an entire room look more styled and polished, and you don't even have to get rid of anything. One tip is to arrange your books so they look like a smooth landscape of rolling hills. Put the tallest in the middle and fan out to the smallest or create multiple peaks (as long as the books flow together) or lay a few books on their side and stack them like a pyramid. For seven more tips to a visually organized bookshelf, click here.
Working on one side at a time, glue and nail the side to the back. Apply glue and drive three 1-5/8-in. nails into each shelf, attach the other side and nail those shelves into place to secure them. Clamps are helpful to hold the unit together while you’re driving nails. Center the top piece, leaving a 2-in. overhang on both sides, and glue and nail it into place. Paint or stain the unit and then drill pilot holes into the top face of each side of the unit and screw in the hooks to hold your ironing board. Mount the shelf on drywall using screw-in wall anchors.

Carving a Fan for Your Next Piece of Furniture The Carved Fan in Furniture Carvings found on 18th furniture are sometimes an ostentatious display of vines and leaves which cover nearly every exposed surface of the chair or chest to which they’re applied. I’ve always had a greater appreciation for minimal amounts of carving that accentuate a furniture […]

Step 3: Place your lampshade upside down on a flat surface. Apply a line of hot glue along the length of one stick's back side, and adhere it to the lampshade, placing the notched handle end flush against the top edge (the ends of the sticks may extend past your shade's bottom edge). Repeat with remaining sticks, placing them side by side until the lampshade is covered. Finally, flip it over and position your shade on a pendant- or table-lamp base to really brighten a room.

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